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British boys will receive HPV vaccine to prevent 'thousands of cancers'

London (CNN)Boys aged 12 and 13 will be offered the HPV vaccine in all British schools from September, in a move health officials say will prevent thousands of cancer cases. Continue to Article

updated: 1 week ago

Wrong information creating ‘dangerous screening gap’ in cervical cancer

NHS England is warning that the misconception that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) women are not at risk of cervical cancer is putting 50,000 LGB women at risk.

The ‘fake news’ has created a dangerous screening gap, as the affected women have never been for a cervical cancer screening test because they wrongly think they are not at risk.

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updated: 1 week ago

KIDS' HEALTH HPV vaccine benefits 'exceed expectations,' may lead to elimination of cervical cancer

updated: 1 week ago

End cervical cancer? The HPV vaccine could do it, study suggests

More than 10 years after it became widely available to the public, a recent analysis of prior studies confirms one thing: The HPV vaccine may be a lifesaver. It could even lead to the outright eradication of cervical cancer. Continue to Article

updated: 1 week ago

HPV Vaccines are Reducing Infections, Warts-- Probably Cancer

updated: 1 week ago

How to talk to parents about HPV vaccines

Fred Hutch public health researcher shares science-based tips to help doctors navigate crucial cancer-prevention conversations Article

updated: 1 week ago

When is HPV a Problem?

updated: 1 week ago

Addressing Cervical Cancer Globally Requires Scaling Up HPV Vaccination, Expanding Screening, Treatment For Women

New York Times: We Have the Resources to Prevent Cervical Cancer. Do We Have the Will?
Mia Armstrong, 2019 graduate of Arizona State University and winner of Nicholas Kristof’s 2019 ‘win-a-trip’ contest

“…Although cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer for women globally, claiming more lives than pregnancy and childbirth, we can save those lives if we can only summon the will. Health experts say that the battle against cervical cancer has two fronts. First, we need to scale up HPV vaccination to prevent cervical cancer. Second, we need to expand screening and treatment for women now in danger. These are relatively affordable, straightforward interventions that can make a big difference in a lot of lives. … But here’s the problem: Only around 25 percent of 10-year-old girls live in countries that have introduced the HPV vaccine, according to WHO estimates from October 2018. … [C]hallenges [to vaccine implementation] are not insurmountable. … If vaccines are the sword in the battle of eliminating cervical cancer, screening initiatives are the shield. … While the Pap test is effective if conducted regularly, it requires a medical structure often lacking in poor countries. So public health experts have experimented with two other screening tests, one that uses vinegar to identify cancer and precancerous lesions, and another that uses DNA to identify HPV infections that could cause cervical cancer. They’re both useful…” (6/10).Continue to Article

updated: 1 week ago

Human trials of HPV cancer vaccine expected to begin by year's end

Researchers have advanced a cancer vaccine to human trials as part of pioneering research aimed at treating incurable HPV cancers of the head, neck, throat and tongue.

The research combines a newly developed Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with immunotherapy and is being spearheaded by Professor Ian Frazer and Brisbane's Princess Alexandra Hospital's Professor Sandro Porceddu.

"We are seeing an unprecedented rise in the incidence of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) with the USA reporting a 225 per cent increase since the 1980s," Professor Porceddu said.

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updated: 1 week ago

Rwanda has fought to stamp out cervical cancer – they might just be the first country to do it

As Rwanda gears up for a new round of vaccinations later this year, the immunologist responsible for the vaccine that has saved so many women’s lives believes the world cannot be complacent. “You can’t be happy until everyone has been vaccinated,” Frazer says.

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updated: 1 week ago